iEARN at 25: A Teddy Bear Picnic

We’re celebrating our furry friends today, and invite you to join our Teddy Bear Picnic. The iEARN Teddy Bear Project has been a favorite of hundreds of thousands of teachers and students in more than 8,000 schools worldwide since 1996, and we’re spending the day sharing stories, images, and the joy of global collaboration in one of its most huggable forms.

Congratulations to all participating schools worldwide, and a big thank you to the current Teddy Bear Project Facilitators Rasagnya Puppala and Fumi (Bee) Ito in Japan, for all their bear care.

Teddy Bear Project
Facilitated by Australian teacher Muriel Wells from 1996-2004, The Teddy Bear Project was awarded 2nd prize in the nonprofit organisation section of the Childnet Awards in London in January, 1998.
The iEARN Teddy Bear Project aims to foster tolerance and understanding using email and/or web forums. After teachers register, the facilitator matches them with a partner class. Once paired, classes send each other a Teddy Bear or other soft toy by airmail through the normal postal system. The bear sends home diary messages by email or through an online forum. In the photo above, Dima from Belarus finds a home in Taiwan.
iEARN Teddy Bear Project - Israel
For the students this special needs school in Israel, the arrival of an iEARN Teddy Bear was a joyful moment.
iEARN Teddy Bear Project - Pakistan
Purpose:
Understand that the world is made up of many different countries.
Help the students grow in self-knowledge.
Help the students learn about the different cultures that are held by people from around the world.
Foster understanding and appreciation of people and of other cultures.
Provide opportunities for the students to communicate with students from other countries who are involved in the Teddy Bear Project.
iEARN Teddy Bear Project - Plan
The iEARN Teddy Bear Project can be integrated into the US Common Core State Standards and national standards worldwide. (Click photo for link to Integration Plan)
Russian students share their Teddy Bear Project candidates.
Russian students share their Teddy Bear Project candidates.
"Chura" wearing Okinawan design Bingata
“Chura” wearing Okinawan design Bingata
iEARN Teddy Bear Project - Australia
iEARN-Canada students sent Bucky the Beaver to Nyirrpi Australia for a #TeddyBearPicnic
image1iEARN Teddy Bear Project - Australia
Welcoming Bucky the Beaver in Nyirrpi, Australia
All children should know that they can connect with peers worldwide even if they have no tech or Internet access.
All children should know that they can connect with peers worldwide even if they have no tech or Internet access.
iEARN Teddy Bear Project - Pakistan
Students of the Beaconhouse School System, GPI, Karachi-Pakistan perform the “Welcome Ceremony of the Bears,” for the three bear guests; Hua Hua, Patrick and Open Jiang, from Wen Hua Elementary School, Taiwan.
iEARN Teddy Bear Project
The iEARN Teddy Bear Project welcomes all stuffed creatures- what’s a picnic without a joey!
Photo from Nyirrpi School, Australia
iEARN Teddy Bear Project - Taiwan
Class 401 and Fang-liao High school in Taiwan is ready to begin its Teddy Bear Project exchange
iEARN Teddy Bear Project
Pre-kindergarten Performance Standards: Social and Emotional Development Standards: Engage in social relationships and develop connections and attachments to peers, classroom adults and to the larger community.
iEARN Teddy Bear Project
“My colleagues and I strongly believe in the influence of puppets on kid’s learning process, therefore, we use them as means of communication and teaching. We have a puppet for each class, which becomes a member of the class from the very first day of the academic year. Each day, the puppet goes home with one of the students and the next day the student has to speak on behalf of the puppet to share her stories and experiences from that day with the class. Our puppets are named Yalda, Chelgees, Oldouze, Maah Pishoony, and Nabaat, all of which were chosen based on Persian Mythology. Each of our puppets have their own story. We can share the stories with you.”
iEARN Teddy Bear Project
A Teddy Bear in East Jerusalem
iEARN Teddy Bear Project
The great thing about iEARN Teddy Bears? They can totally just hang out in Taiwan. Cool as a cucumber.
iEARN Teddy Bear Project
Worldwide, Teddy Bears get royal treatment. These students in Uzbekistan prepare outfits.
iEARN Teddy Bear Project
More Teddy Bear coddling in Uzbekistan
iEARN Teddy Bear Project
Hard to hug through a Skype call, a Tweet, or e-mail. For students worldwide, Teddy Bears are squeezable global education. A class in Edison, New Jersey, USA.
iEARN Teddy Bear Project
iEARN-Iraq students know how to have a #TeddyBearPicnic.
iEARN Teddy Bear Project - USA
Michael’s Essentials: Michael, his dog, and his Teddy
iEARN Teddy Bear Project
A Teddy Bear in Jerusalem.
iEARN Teddy Bear Project
A Teddy Bear in Jerusalem meets a friend.
iEARN Teddy Bear Project
Thank you to all the students at the Beaconhouse School System, Pakistan!






4 thoughts on “iEARN at 25: A Teddy Bear Picnic

  1. Reblogged this on Map without Borders and commented:

    Although we have participated in iEARN projects before, for the first time, a class in our school, Mill Creek Elementary in Geneva, IL, USA, participated in the Teddy Bear Project through iEARN. It’s been great hearing about their exchange with Wen Ya Elementary in Taiwan.

    What a great organization. There are many global collaborative education organizations out there now, but iEARN…well, they were the true cutting edge for us all. They have only become stronger in their numbers, larger in their geographic reach and curriculum scope, and more influential during their 25 years. Lucky for all of us, they have retained all of their professional generosity, humanity and incredible inclusiveness. They are true leaders in every possible way. Happy 25th iEARN! I’m proud to be among your many admirers and participant teachers.

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